Quick Answer: Should You Hire Someone Overqualified?

Is it better to be overqualified or underqualified?

Overqualified candidates may be able to hit the ground running, but they might need more out of the role after a shorter period of time.

Underqualified candidates may be more likely to think outside the box, but it could take some time before they’re ready to make waves in the organization..

Can you reject someone for being overqualified?

“However, case law says that a person who is overqualified is, by definition, qualified, so the person cannot be rejected on that basis,” Edwards cautions.

Can you really be overqualified for a job?

Yet having too much experience could make you overqualified for the job – which could be to your detriment. Employers may worry you’d demand too high of a salary, you’d want a promotion right away or you’d get bored and move on to another job quickly.

How do you know if candidates are overqualified?

Be honest. Don’t promise overqualified candidates that you’ll reach out soon for more suitable opportunities, if you’re only hiring for entry-level roles. Opt for a simple “Best of luck with your job search” to end things on a positive note.

Are you overqualified for this position?

When you’re searching for a new role, the real question you must answer is if you are “overqualified” or “fully qualified” for a position. If you are overqualified for a position, what that likely means is that you are applying for a step-down position or a position below your education level or your experience.

Why you should not hire overqualified?

The biggest obstacle to hiring overqualified workers is under-qualified managers—someone who got promoted beyond their skill level and just tries to hide. They don’t want to make mistakes or to be noticed. They don’t want anyone in their team to do anything because it might reflect badly on the manager.